Economic Recovery

Maternal employment will not recover to pre-crisis levels without a significant and strategic investment in our childcare infrastructure, female leaders say in an open letter to the Prime Minister.
The recent budget again shone the spotlight on the UK's precarious economic position. Despite years of austerity, public spending cuts, Quantitative Easing and some limited stimulating activity such as taking the lowest paid out of tax, the country is still in grave danger of falling back into recession. But we're not alone. The global economic outlook is poor. And western countries have hardly recovered from the last great recession.
Addressing the skills shortages must be on the priority list if British businesses are to continue to play a pivotal role on the world's economic stage. Failing to do so will lead to potentially dangerous long term consequences for the UK's future recovery.
Fighting against growing levels of precarity, unemployment, poverty and homelessness - in Spain and, contrary to what our government claims, in the UK - also requires us to reclaim what should belong to the state and its citizens, to us.
The apparent 'economic recovery' of the UK of May 2015, can be seen in the extremely dubious terms set by the formerly incumbent Conservative-led coalition government, and none more so than in the widespread use of food banks and payday loans by the unemployed, and 'working poor' alike.
The war on the poor aka 'welfare reform' is being waged with that much more ferocity and that much more cynicism in the weeks
The current housing and property crisis affects all Londoners and it is of utmost importance that the Chancellor addresses these issues. It is our responsibility as citizens and government officials to tackle this situation head-on in order to improve the quality of life for all Londoners.
Oxfam is in Liberia and Sierra Leone for the long haul. We're continuing to work with communities to build understanding of Ebola treatment and how to stay healthy, providing financial support to help families get back on their feet, and helping them guard against infectious diseases by equipping schools and clinics with clean water and sanitation.
Debt is a serious problem. It is not just a problem for those unfortunate enough to be struggling with financial difficulties, but for all of us - debt costs society £8.3billion. These costs come in the form of additional health care costs, increased welfare spending, and reduced workplace productivity.
The Autumn Statement was the Government's last chance to ensure the economic recovery does not bypass the worst off. This opportunity was missed.