Ed Milliband

I turned up late from a book launch in London, wondering how to approach this high stakes poker game of a general election
This is the first General Election campaign I have lived through where I am at a loss who to vote for.
David Cameron, Ed Miliband and all the other party leaders will be jostling for voters' final decisions over the coming week in the lead-up to 7 May but on social media, one of their key communications tools, I feel they've got it all wrong.
With less than a week to the election, people around the UK have repeatedly said that they want to vote for a leader they can trust, who gives clear answers on their policies and who can explain how they are different from everyone else.
Election season brings out the worst in people. We turn a blind eye to our politicians as they rummage through dirty laundry, hoping for something gross. Some of us even salute them for it (their courage, strength and indefatigability). But all I see are shameless perverts - looking for panties to sniff. But even in this this toxic atmosphere, one group gets it worse than others.
Whether or not you agree with his recent comments, that the survivors who risked all to escape Libya should be sent back, it's important that we all try to understand what drove people to take such risks. The simple answer is extreme poverty.
In 2010 I properly voted in a General election for the first time. I had put my card in the ballot boxes before, but always spoiled it by writing 'who' or 'none of these people' or something on it.
With the General Election appearing on the horizon, the choice of which party to vote for has created the same dilemma as deciding upon how best you would like to be killed. The only difference being that if you are dead, you would not have to contemplate the outcomes of the choice of political party you have had to make.
This is going to continue throughout the whole of 2015 because after CBB we've got the General Election where the politicians will argue, the papers will print embarrassing stories and somehow this will result in a lot of airtime for Katie Hopkins.
Labour's latest policy announcement, creation of a committee of English MPs to scrutinise bills only relating to England, highlights the party's panic over the Conservatives popular English Votes for English Laws (EVEL) proposals.