Edinburgh Fringe comedy

Children are brilliant aren't they? They smile for no reason, dance in the street, cuddle strangers (even when advised otherwise), they say what they mean and they dream big. Children are a big deal at this year's Edinburgh Fringe. Comedy for children and children's theatre seem to be doing fantastically well.
While I salute the bravery of anyone who's prepared to face an unruly crowd and be funny, I believe most of the stand-ups currently performing in the UK lack moral courage, engagement with the real world, and experience of life.
I'm a stand up comedian and actor, and people usually ask me which I prefer. I tend to reply with something vague like: "I like them both in different ways", but this year at the Edinburgh Fringe I've had the opportunity to directly compare and contrast them because every day I am doing a solo stand up show and a play.
About 18 months ago, I received a succession of emails from a woman who became a little bit obsessed with fulfilling her wish of me becoming her boyfriend. I thwarted her numerous advances and tried to let her down as gently as I could, using the usual methods employed by online dating enthusiasts.
It's hard getting through a whole month at the Edinburgh Festival. And as for the performers... Yes, from Alex Horne to Richard
A gag about a chocolate bar has been named the funniest joke of the Edinburgh Fringe. Rob Auton's winning wisecrack was one
The best feedback I can have are smiles - and I have learned that standing on the upper stage on the Royal Mile and yelling about incontinence at the people passing by makes them smile. Though, some of them may have been grimacing.
This year we are living in the beating heart of the Edinburgh Festival, on the Royal Mile itself. If you haven't been to the Edinburgh Festival, the Royal Mile is what you will have seen montages of on the telly. An endless cacophony of singing, drumming, shouting, strumming, fire-breathing, hula-hooping, banner-waving, self-promoting, whirling desperation
Putting on a show at the Edinburgh Fringe is like getting into the hopper that selects lotto numbers and punching the balls until, maybe, the desired numbers come up.
Can't wait to find out whom the nominees are for this years Edinburgh Awards? You don't have to. GQ Comedy Editor James Mullinger