Education for All

Every child, no matter whether their country is rich or poor, whether they live in a village or a city, should be going to school today. Yet despite the 2015 deadline to provide 'Education for All' this isn't happening. Our collective failure to reach global education goals means that 121 million children and adolescents are being denied their right to attend school.
The 12th GMR report has just been launched: 'Education for All 2000-2015: achievements and challenges.' The Report shows how the world has done in achieving the six Education for All goals set out in Dakar in 2000.
How many teachers do we need? The year 2015 is just around the corner, and yet UIS data show that  countries will need to recruit about 4 million more teachers to achieve universal primary education by the deadline.
Improving quality in Pakistan would also be a huge breakthrough. In rural areas many primary schools lack sufficient classrooms to provide a proper five year cycle: In Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, for example, more than half of the schools do not contain the requisite 5 classrooms (one per grade). If you were a parent, would you send your children to school, and keep them there, if school conditions meant that your children were unlikely to learn the basics?
As we consider the sorry state of international aid to education we must also remember that accessing school is also only part of the challenge; universal primary education goes beyond simply children enrolling in school - it also involves enabling them to complete their education and, as a result, acquire basic skills and knowledge...
Humanitarian aid makes up only a small share of the external financing for education: The sector received only 2% of humanitarian appeals in 2013 - a long way from the modest 4% target set by the UN last year.
Anyone working in communications will have a few tips to hand out for writing a compelling document. Writing must be clear and concise. With no space to waste, key messages should not be repetitive without good reason. They should be written in simple language and avoid ambiguity.
It is troubling that the 9% decline in aid spending to basic education in low income countries between 2010 and 2011 has hit 19 of the poorest countries - Tanzania amongst them. Without donor support to education as promised in 2000 at the World Education Forum in Dakar, these countries will struggle to provide the quality of education that their children deserve.
Margaret, a teacher in Nairobi, is the fifth participant in the EFA Global Monitoring Report's 10-week #TeacherTuesday campaign