election

Education needs better, fairer funding. It needs stability, not change for its own sake and increased uncertainty. It needs recognition of actual problems and innovative thinking in solving them. This can only happen if channels of communication between all those who have a stake in the education community are kept open. Whoever is in office, we must make sure that the education debate continues.
Things clearly need to change and I know I'm not alone in thinking this; people are beginning to put their foot down and say enough is enough. So despite my major fears for a Tory/DUP coalition, I am incredibly excited to see the positive impact of a new meaning of 'people power'. We won't let them get away with any old policies anymore!
Tackling intergenerational inequity is the challenge of our times. Economic measures are required urgently to address the housing crisis and develop fairer taxation. But we also need to bring older and younger people together to discuss mutual concerns and provide shared spaces which can promote stronger understanding and trust between people of all ages.
EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW UK votes for hung parliament with Tories falling short of majority Theresa May will visit Queen
Millions of us are heading to the polls today to decide the future of our country - and to choose our MP. For all its flaws, this is a huge exercise in democracy, and one we can all be proud of. Too often we take for granted the power to change government peacefully and democratically. But it is a hard won right and one which too many people continue to have to fight for.
Although voter turnout is lower than in years gone by, it's been on the up since 2001, in part helped by the rise in digital technologies which has made politics more accessible and digestible for the general public.
As the UK prepares for an election on Thursday, we should be alert to the hidden tactics that could influence the result. But it's also damaging to be dystopian. As with many aspects of our rapidly changing world, AI could fundamentally disrupt democracy or bolster it, and the outcome will depend on our actions. It's our responsibility to ensure that the opportunities are maximised just as the risks are minimised.
Visiting the polling station with your parents on election day isn't your traditional family day out. But my son aged six and twins aged four have asked to come along. They know it's also their future we will be voting for.
Manifestos from all parties have followed the same logic, imprisoned by the terms of a debate they did not set. The blind following the blind. Parties should recognise this and, at the next election, follow Theresa May in not costing their manifestos at all.