election

If the terrible events of this week have proven anything, it's that Theresa May has a callus regard for the safety of British citizens. She wants to be the Iron Lady, Thatcher mark II, but if we are to judge her on her record -- which we all should -- it's clear that all she has is an iron heart.
This proud port community is on the frontline of a global political upheaval.
Assuming May wins this election, which I am, this won't necessarily be the end of Corbyn. If he increases Labour's vote share significantly, which currently looks very likely, he will be able to stay on as leader.
As I said, I've learnt a lot over the past few years campaigning, but perhaps the key thing I learnt was something no one ever tells us, because if really taken to heart the country would change overnight: you don't need to be knowledgeable, charismatic, ruthless or rich to be 'political': you just need to be angry.
The UK General Election is now only a week away, and it arrives against the backdrop of media hype and coverage surrounding possible attempts by hackers to influence national elections (see: US, French elections).
If nothing else, the success of the Tories in turning us into passive spectators of the mass experiment in human despair they have inflicted on the most vulnerable in society should be foremost in our minds when we cast our vote on June 8.
The Conservative Manifesto makes reference to the intake of selective schools, but not to the end result of their re-introduction: a two-tier education system within which different children have access to different opportunities, not the 'Great Meritocracy' claimed. For this election, let's remember what the real problems facing education are and focus on what needs to happen to deliver an education system fit for the 21st century to every child.
Never once in a professional kitchen have I heard complaint about 'bloody foreigners taking our jobs'. Far more likely to be discussed over the stoves is a lack of staff and desire. It is of paramount importance and deep concern that current post-election,Theresa May's playing politics with post-brexit Government proposals will have Britain's restaurant industry on it's knees. Don't let this happen. Please vote.
What is at the heart of this is that Theresa May and 'her team' do not respect or trust ordinary voters enough to make a judgement - and that can't be good for this country. She and they don't even trust core Tory voters enough to have Mrs May show a bit of courage under adversity and earn their respect.
"I'm not going anywhere," she says. "I have a big stake in what happens in this country. I'm unbowed and unbroken about what happened. I don't want it to happen to anyone else, or to happen to the values or institutions I care about... We're at a very pivotal point, so I'm going to keep writing, and talking, and supporting the people who are on the front lines of the resistance."