elitism

People were being given a chance to make Shakespeare their own, and in the magnificent Globe theatre no less, who were not usually given this chance. And they were being given the chance to do so on their own terms, in ways that resonated with them
We need to squash the redundant notion that it is a subject purely for the linguistically capable elite, and open the doors to the less privileged. This subject is not limited only to language study; the ancient world is full of areas of exploration, so let's not pretend academic scholarship must be limited to linguistics. It's time elitism was shunned from the Classics community and Classical Civilisation is accepted and promoted to all.
Oxbridge elitism has hindered generations of working-class British students, but it also hinders our diplomatic efforts. By dismissing the stories of young, urban working class Russians in academia, we fail to recognise that it is Putin and his supporters we have to engage with, rather than Pushkin.
Students who know that Oxbridge isn't engaged in a mission to create spend-a-holic graduates with world domination as their goal - which necessarily mean those students either with family who have attended Cambridge, or experienced life at Cambridge through one of the excellent access schemes - will continue to apply. The status quo will endure.
When I was growing up I wanted to be the American tennis champion Jimmy Connors. To be honest, I wanted to be sweary, stroppy, petulant John McEnroe (which I kind of was anyway) but my mum preferred his more charming, coiffured rival so Jimmy it was.
In Tory Britain, the fact that I missed out on a scholarship - and consequently the chance to take a postgraduate degree in newspaper journalism - will hardly be tragedy of the decade. Yet it does illustrate a very troubling point: journalism is increasingly becoming the preserve of the elite.
With the 'Trinity of Referenda' now over in Oxford, it is worth considering what the two campaigns, and the results, ultimately showed about the Oxford student politics.
The idea that this is simply making subfusc optional rather than a de facto abolition is to miss the point somewhat.
The very nature of the Greek system is divisive, backwards and insular. It is a breeding ground for misogynistic thinking and behaviour.
For many it's been a struggle to get there. Young actors emerge from their training weighed down by debt, and - given that less than 2% of actors earn over £20,000 a year from their acting - many leave the profession in the first 5 to 10 years, to seek financial security, dignity, and some quality of life.