Emails

American Vice President Mike Pence used a private AOL account that was hacked last summer, when he was governor of Indiana.
This revelation will ring in our ears every time we see the humble, smiling Beckham with an African child in his arms, whenever he appears on stage for Unicef, whenever he posts an Instagram snap of his daughter Harper showing daddy who's boss.
There are several reasons this happened, but one has haunted me most: Hillary Clinton's leaked emails. Since the "scandal" broke, I've become terrified of hacking. This isn't because I may run for President myself (#SLH2020), but because the vulnerability of the Clinton campaign's email accounts bodes badly for the rest of us.
While I don't agree with mass surveillance and I do believe in the right to respect one's "private and family life," the outcry also got me thinking about why bosses snooping on our emails could be a good thing.
Legislation has not been altered as a result of Tuesday's judgment. In short, not much has changed. On the positive side, perhaps this week's misinformed media storm will help persuade workers and their bosses to clarify exactly where the boundaries lie concerning personal communications at work.
A group of teenagers have claimed to have hacked into the head of the CIA's personal AOL email account, which reportedly
I use Facebook to message with my brother, Viber to exchange pictures with friends, Skype to call my Japanese teacher. But
On mobile, messaging platforms have taken over from voice and are still outstripping the various social media vehicles, but these are skewed towards consumers talking to each other. B2B marketing is still evolving on these channels, while the one-to-one of email is still comfortable for users.
Like the return of vinyl to music, people are turning to email again as a source of wisdom.
"This 'LOL'? You and I are not in a relationship yet where we can just chuckle and laugh about things..." Yes, any students