emotional health

Experts weigh in on what you should really be doing.
Having open and honest conversations about misogyny can go a long way.
I listened to the crying every night but one night I heard the father opposite sobbing. His child was getting worse. Doctors and nurses rushed in, discussing next steps. At that moment, a flash of insight hit me: this pain is universal. It's not personal, it's not mine alone. That's just the way things are.
The term "mental health" is, more often than not, used within the context of discussing mental illness rather than mental
The civil rights campaigner and poet Maya Angelou once said her mission was to thrive, not just survive. Like Angelou, we all want full and rewarding lives. Yet too many of us are struggling on a daily basis just to keep ourselves together emotionally.
With children's mental health problems on the rise, it's clear that young people who are suffering need our support more
At a certain stage in their lives, our young-adult children leave an institution of higher education (be in high school, college or university) with a piece of paper that declares them literate and numerate, and thus ready for the world of work.
The Department for Education's recent announcement that Sex and Relationships Education (SRE) will be mandatory in schools, starting at age 4, is one that may scare some teachers. Sex is often seen as a taboo subject, even in general society, and for a teacher speaking to a classroom full of children delivering SRE could be an embarrassing prospect.
By supporting programmes to improve children's social and emotional health in parallel at school and in the home, the Government can help parents and educators to improve life outcomes for children, protect against mental health issues, raise academic attainment, and give children the skills to live emotionally healthy lives.
It is impossible to support the social and emotional health of young people, if we as teachers do not attend to our own emotional health.