employee engagement

In recent years, drastic changes have occurred in the workplace. Previously the aim of the employer was to restrain staff
At a point where the Care sector is desperate for innovative solutions to challenges of low pay, an approach which makes employees owners in their business, and which drives their engagement, is one which more providers should examine closely.
I'm talking about the side of mental health we avoid talking about, the side that makes us feel embarrassed, the one that has a stigma and makes people feel uncomfortable - mental health problems. The truth is that throughout our lives we are very likely to experience a mental health problem, temporary or longer-term.
With the rise of online shopping, retailers were forced to rethink how they attract people to come into stores, and then how they convert those visits into sales. By giving people an in-store experience that they can't get online, brands have found the answer
How are world class employees meant to deliver world class performance if the tools they are given are holding them back? In the digital age, poor IT equals poor productivity. Nothing more and nothing less. It's time for a change, a culture shift, to empower employees and drive productivity.
Before I jump in, why don't we just flip this on its head and have a look at what employee disengagement looks like. If you're
Ultimately, it is a win-win situation. A happy, skilled and motivated employee is far more likely to do a better job, while they are also far less likely to jump ship at the first opportunity.
The HR world is awash with buzzwords and hot topics - search Google for wellbeing at work and you get 58 million results
Having been on the conference circuit over the last few months (Wellbeing at Work, HR Summit Barcelona and CIPD Annual Conference) we've heard the term 'resilience' being discussed in many of the seminars and break-out sessions. Many delegates have wanted to discuss that word on our stand, too:
Post traumatic stress disorder is well known - normally associated with soldiers off the battlefield. Less well-known is that around three quarters of people who survive critical illnesses get post intensive care syndrome, which is very similar.