end the awkward

May 27, 2013. A date I will never forget. The day I suffered a life threatening allergic reaction known as anaphylactic shock. My throat swelled, my oxygen levels were dangerously low and if it wasn't for the proactive medics around me, I would have died.
I was shocked and upset by the comments, however, I am not by any means naïve to the world of trolling or online bullying. I know that no-one is exempt these days. If you are LGBTQ, BAME, a feminist, a politician or even a Kardashian, you are left vulnerable to online attacks.
I'm currently residing in the trendy east London area that is Shoreditch and I would classify myself as a 'fashionista'. I go shopping on the High Street almost every week but I still don't see images of people like me staring back from the hundreds of advertisements.
I'm lucky. I'm happily partnered up with someone who looks at me a bit oddly when I suggest that my disability might have put him off me. But it's true that lots of people feel uncomfortable even talking to disabled people, let alone thinking about dating them - let alone thinking about (whisper it!) sex with them.
I feel the same way as Idris Elba. Because as a disabled person, I rarely see "people like me" on television or in the media either. The numbers speak for themselves. There are 11million disabled people living in Britain today. Yet just 2.5% of people on screen are disabled.
If you let the disabled person decide if and what they tell you with in conversation you won't offend anyone. Remember, for every disabled person like me, happy with their life and secure in their impairment, there will be some who are not yet ready to talk about their lives.
The more people try not to speak about someone's disability or difference, the more they'll end up stumbling - and it's very obvious to that person what's going on. And they won't be offended! I don't mind somebody acknowledging my height or talking about dwarfism. To be honest, if they're curious or inquisitive, I'd rather we did chat about it.