Engage Works

E-commerce has forever altered customer expectations, but now it's bricks and mortars changing the way we engage with brands. From engineered serendipity to personalised environments, new technologies are giving retailers the opportunity to deliver exciting, unique, and sharable experiences you can't get online or in an app.
With the rise of online shopping, retailers were forced to rethink how they attract people to come into stores, and then how they convert those visits into sales. By giving people an in-store experience that they can't get online, brands have found the answer
It's January and many people are working hard to keep their New Year's resolutions to get fit and be healthy, and there's an extensive number of companies out there who want to help you do this. In 2016 approximately 60% of mobile phone users downloaded health-related apps, and fitness-tracking wearables are projected to exceed $14bn by 2021.
One of the biggest challenges with new technologies is adoption and integration into our lives, with gamers and proud tech-geeks blazing the trails for society to eventually catch up. But with so many people around the world now sharing a common activity through Pokémon Go...
Millennials (also known as the Millennial Generation or Generation Y) are the demographic cohort following Generation X. With approximately 14 million in their ranks, Millennials or Generation Y are quite unlike previous generations.
You touch the screen of your device to feel the fabric. You turn your head to access your real closet to see if that belt you bought last month matches the jacket. It does, and you like it, so you buy it instantly, no cash, no cards, and a couple hours later a drone delivers it to your doorstep.
Gamers, movie-goers, entertainment enthusiasts or, quite simply, experience-hungry millennials are crying for mainstream, cheaper virtual reality. But as new VR kid on the block Vive continues to intrigue users, we have to ask ourselves who will end up being credited with bringing this incredible technology to the masses.
Most businesses dream of going global, and British tech companies are no exception to the rule. But while it seems obvious that the latest crop of Silicon Roundabout trailblazers (tech firms based in London's Tech City) should expand to their Silicon "sister" in California, that might not always be the right choice.