entrepreneurship education

The future isn't set in stone, however it is clear that technology will highly impact the working population, in some cases for the better and in others for the worse, and the reality is that everyone is vulnerable to these changes.
Fortunately, being an entrepreneur has now become much easier thanks to new technologies and the internet, which have reduced the risk of setting up in business significantly. Lack of job opportunities has also driven entrepreneurial change and so made starting up your own business a much more attractive alternative.
The reality is that today, anybody with ambition, determination and courage can start a successful business - whatever their age. And it's true for the over-50s too. In fact, 'baby boomer' businesses are booming, as more and more of them take the entrepreneurial plunge.
Starting a business isn't easy for anyone while young people face their own disadvantages. They usually have less capital to support them, they might have student debts, and getting a business loan is going to be much harder. As unfair as it is, some people have less respect for the young and that's going to have an effect when they're competing against older people for resources when launching a start-up.
This morning I hosted a free online class {live webinar} to which not one of the registrants showed up. How would you respond to the same situation?
Even in our technological age, people are still the best asset of any business. Unfortunately, while employers may want the best from those they employ, not all are prepared to give it. And not all companies are willing to invest in their workforce to make sure that happens.
These guys should be an inspiration to anyone who has ever wanted to set up their own business doing something they love, but hasn't, maybe because they haven't wanted to borrow the funds to do it with or simply didn't know how to get sta
It shouldn't come as any surprise to learn that children are for the most part pretty happy. After all, they have lots of play time, get everything done for them and don't have to worry about paying the bills.
How much leisure time do we actually need? I ask the question because new research suggests that we are starting to think differently about our 'time off'.
520,000 new businesses were created in the UK last year, with nearly 73,000 of them (14%) set up by former corporate employees - as a nation we're clearly becoming increasingly entrepreneurial and maybe even recapturing something of our "bulldog spirit" when it comes to trade and innovation.