erasmus

The repercussions of Brexit have been measured almost exclusively in economic and political terms. Very little has been said about the impact on the country's reputation, particularly among young people in Europe and further afield.
Withdrawal negotiations will be taking place into 2018 which will make things a lot more clear in terms of the exact implications of what will come when the UK ceases to be a member of the EU and is no longer subject to its treaties.
Prior to Erasmus year, preparations centred around the financing of it, grants, part time jobs, au pairing etc. It isn't
Many young people have expressed their frustrations about the outcome of the Brexit referendum. The European Union offers opportunities which are now at risk, they argue.
In this day and age, we forget that not everything has to be online. You don't even have to make it known to everyone and share it on the Internet - I just did because I'm an attention-whore. It can be a link that you keep to yourself.
Hubsy Café If you can't study at home but feel guilty that you're throwing money down the drain on your fifth latte at Starbucks
As the UK embarks on the most complex series of discussions ever undertaken, the outcome of which will significantly define the future of our country, I will always keep in mind the contagious energy, passion and hope of all the local students I met last year and the millions of younger people across the UK. They are looking for a voice to defend their life chances. We will do our utmost to deliver.
Erasmus will always be a leap of faith, immersing yourself in the unknown, hoping that it will lead to adventure, rewards, and unique experiences. It won't be for everyone. Putting yourself out of your comfort zone so starkly in foreign lands is no mean feat. But no matter what you'll learn that adventure is out there, the world is vast and ready to be travelled whenever you are.
Ah, final year. The brutal reminder that university isn't quite the time of your life that you were once promised as a Fresher. Amongst my looming deadlines, pending seminar work and an endless reading list, my plans to get try and get myself on the career ladder is not going too well.
Surprise surprise, you're not fluent in French yet. A year abroad is supposedly the best experience you'll ever have. You've heard rumours of fresh croissants for breakfast in Paris, envisaged yourself becoming a pro-surfer in Australia, and you can't wait to update your Facebook status to "moved to Italy".