ethical shopping

The buzz of buying new clothes or makeup can quickly wear off when you realise that sweatshops, child labour or animal testing are behind your bargain buy, and over-consumption can have a negative impact on the environment too.
The time has finally come: ethical consumerism is going mainstream! It's exciting to have seen the ethical mindset become a more widely-recognised and accepted concept, and in ways that are natural and low-effort too.
As consumers, our purchases have a significant impact on the world around us - but it's not always positive. One of the biggest ways we can influence change is by "voting with our wallets" and making more ethical decisions about what we buy. Being an ethical consumer means choosing products and services that don't harm people, animals or the environment, but how easy is it to do?
"By buying vintage or used clothing you are doing good in a variety of ways:
Want to be an ethical consumer? It's as simple as buying locally.
So, you're interested in living more ethically. In a world full of media distrust, political scandals and alternative facts, it's no surprise really. I'm feeling the same - I want to know where my food comes from, who made my clothes, and treat people - and the planet - in a respectful way.
The Bali I dreamed of growing up was not the Bali that exists today--all thanks to the careless acts of tourists.
From supporting small businesses to divesting.
Something I hear a lot from people is that they would love to shop more ethically, but ethical clothing is just too expensive. And I do get that. When money is tight it's only natural to want that budget to spread as far as possible.
Here in India, the money crisis has passed and the daily allowance from ATMs is back to normal. It was humbling to witness how very patiently the locals coped throughout the crisis, with a calm and unruffled attitude, whilst I struggled to constrain my inherent urban angst.