European Debt Crisis

Can the Euro collapse? It is my opinion that it is inevitable that the single currency will break apart. This is not any Eurosceptic wishful thinking, nor do I relish the havoc that this would cause. I do believe, however, that the internal pressures within the Euro are unsolvable and this will lead to its collapse. And it is all down to the bond market.
With debts cut by a sufficient amount, Greece should then incrementally exit the Euro at a stable rate, probably having a dual currency for a time. Markets do not like shock, and a progressive exit is, for me, the logical and reasonable solution. The alternatives are just too hideous to contemplate.
The brutal political violence inflicted by the EU on Greece, and the inevitability of expanded globalisation and corrupt trade deals, show us that this dream is not one we can achieve by remaining in the EU. The only way we can truly send the EU a message will be by voting to leave it on the 23rd June.
When I recently told a colleague that I want the UK to leave the EU, she expressed considerable dismay that someone of my background - mixed-race, working class, comprehensive education - was lining up with far-right racists. Such a misguided view of the people who support Brexit does a disservice to the millions of Britons up and down the UK, who are now in a majority that understands why it is morally, politically and economically essential for Britain to leave the EU.
As the UK prepares to enter the later preparation stages of what would arguably be the most important referendum of its modern history, it seems that the EU is doing its best to turn most of the European population against it.
Welfare state policies are the link between economic crisis, unemployment and far right party support. Welfare cuts have increased the insecurity of the European middle classes that are being hit by the economic crisis. This matters because of the implications it has for policy. By reversing austerity, which results in welfare cuts and increases insecurity, we can limit the appeal of right-wing extremism.
One thing is clear, that Alexis Tspiras must stand firm in sweeping waters and against the rising tide. Historians will often say that European man is Greek in provenance. As citizens of Europe we know that Syriza is making decisions in constrained space and time, and that they should be proud -- whatever the outcome -- that they have sought to represent a demographic that extends beyond Greece and touches the heart of Europe.
It is of interest that in rejecting the bailout deal in their historic referendum the Greek people did not reject either the Euro or the European Union. Despite the economic unrest that Greece has experienced over the last few years, OXI was, in its purest form, an affirmation -- the Greek people still hope the EU will listen to them.
Earlier this week Naomi Klein was asked in Twitter whether she thought that what we are seeing in Greece corresponds to the
I deeply believe in Greece inside Europe of democracy, of altruism, of common institutions and firm relationships. Greece and its bond with Euro was born of respect and faith and by no means should it die of arrogance.