Expat Life

If there's one thing repatriating after a twenty-seven year absence will teach you it's that there are no stupid questions. You might feel stupid asking them at the time, as I did when handed a green plastic disc in the supermarket, but if you're to make any headway, pride must be swallowed.
So for those thinking about making the move Down Under for a smooth transition from the UK, why not see if your skills are still needed in Australia, you may be surprised by what you find.
Parents share their children's worries about fitting in, nearly a quarter find it difficult to form new friendships of their own. Parents also have to contend with the financial pressures of raising a family abroad. Indeed, our survey has found that 62% of expat parents find the overall cost of raising children abroad more expensive than at home.
When I left England, there was no Internet, cell phones were the size of micro-waves and couldn't be used for anything other than verbal communication, and self-check-outs, mercifully, had yet to be invented.
The internet is awash with wild tales of expat life, all the money and glamour and luxuries, but we were (and still are) entirely disinterested in becoming the stereotype. We just wanted to take a great opportunity, save a bit of cash (hopefully), and set our family up for a more secure future than the UK was able to offer us.
If you were to grow up being placed on some sort of pedestal, being admired and photographed for no reason other than existing, wouldn't you have a warped sense of your place in the world? It's no wonder the term used here so often is "expat brats".
I've lived in the UK for 8.5 years now and I only started filing my American taxes.
There's a great quote from Stephen Fry about what happens when you're British in the USA. I shouldn't be saying this - high
In case there's a Brit in America facing this dilemma right now, here are a few other names you might want to ditch for the sake of your sanity. Remember, these kids stick around for quite a while, as do the pronunciation peeves.
Eight months after moving to Denmark, I'm now straddling that crepuscule between things being novel and others becoming the norm, so in this lucid moment I wanted to jot down a few observations, about my experience of Denmark and, more importantly, about the people who hail from it - an invitees examination, if you will.