expats

Abandoning ship and running home is rarely an option, so you're left to stick out this expat existence wondering if you've made a terrible mistake.
When I left England, there was no Internet, cell phones were the size of micro-waves and couldn't be used for anything other than verbal communication, and self-check-outs, mercifully, had yet to be invented.
My boy was made in Italy, took his first breath in the UK, cut teeth in Hong Kong, was pre-schooled in Australia and primary schooled back in the UK. His sister's birth certificate bears a picture of the Sydney Harbour Bridge but her passport's a very regal British burgundy, which was issued in New Zealand.
The internet is awash with wild tales of expat life, all the money and glamour and luxuries, but we were (and still are) entirely disinterested in becoming the stereotype. We just wanted to take a great opportunity, save a bit of cash (hopefully), and set our family up for a more secure future than the UK was able to offer us.
If you were to grow up being placed on some sort of pedestal, being admired and photographed for no reason other than existing, wouldn't you have a warped sense of your place in the world? It's no wonder the term used here so often is "expat brats".
The word expat is an unnatural one that has derived from a British sentiment of superiority deriving from our colonialist past that allowed us to assume our supremacy, since the countries we invaded were unable to challenge it. We need to get over these remnants of our colonialist history that are still ingrained into the British psyche.
In addition, nationals of 88 non-EU countries (including Russia) working in the EU are accorded the same rights as EU citizens by agreements between these countries and the EU. Why can't Britain become the 89th such country? As far as I am aware, this possibility has never been raised by anyone in the UK. And, once again, these are agreements with the EU as a whole, not with individual EU member-states.
Governing party wants its membership to cross frontiers and link with former anti-apartheid movements
What do you think of when I say expat wife? An easy life of G&Ts with the gals post-brunch? Supportive of the spouse whilst also having a hot tennis coach on speed dial? Shopping habits to rival Carrie Bradshaw?
What we hadn't put much thought into at all was the seasonal timing of the move. In hindsight, moving from a warm climate like Singapore to a Scottish city at the start of at least six months of cold, grey, dreary weather was never going to be ideal. Here are my top five things to consider before moving from a warm climate to a cold Scottish winter: