experiential learning

The initial outcomes of our analysis illustrate the impact of a well-rounded education on improving soft skills such as creativity, confidence and problem solving. In addition to fostering a love of learning and an international perspective in our students, we are trying to prepare them with the skills needed to succeed in life; skills which can never be replaced by robots or automation.
I've spent the past few weekends renovating the Victorian brickwork on our house. The bricks are a lovely warm shade of orange
It may never be possible to iron out every scoundrel with wayward principles, but using values as the basis for learning and development could ultimately count for much more than a few thousand quid on swindled expenses.
The divide between education and work finds its echo in the divide between young and established workers. It seems optimistic to assume that as the number of workplace generations increases these divisions will heal organically.
When the great Pete Seeger died last month the world lost a truly authentic individual. Seeger combined music and activism
By implementing formally structured experiential learning programmes, the combined forces of CR and L&D could maximize the value of experiences, enabling colleagues to return to the workplace with fresh self-awareness, insight and focus. It's an opportunity not to be sniffed at.
During 2013 our office became collectively addicted to Breaking Bad. For those not hooked the drama, streamed by Netflix
Finally it's happening. You're on stage. Under the lights. Staring out into the audience. A conference of hundreds. A sea of faces, each focused on you, hungry for your insights, primed for your wisdom. You smile and your gaze drops to the autocue. It's dead. The carefully crafted words locked away and, in the panic that washes over you, completely irretrievable from your mind...
As learning and development professionals we have a responsibility to nurture the skills to make bridging a reality. We can start by helping people to learn and develop, not just in homogeneous flocks in isolated training rooms or the sealed environments of remote learning, but also via experiential learning that exposes them to real-life unfamiliar others.
What is clear is that emerging factors have combined to expose big business and its place in society to increasingly intense and critical scrutiny. A very selective list might include the banking crisis and corporate tax scandals, the shrinking state, climate change and other environmental impacts, and the inequities and injustices in value chains, so horribly highlighted at the Dhaka garment factory.