Facebook IPO

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has sold around $2.3 billion of his shares in the company, in order to pay a tax bill. Zuckerberg
Twitter is to go public. The social network announced - on Twitter, naturally - that it had submitted documents ahead of
Facebook is at a pivotal crossroads. Ever since its stock market flotation, the social giant has had a tough problem to address: how can it become profitable without alienating its user base? Myspace couldn't manage it (sorry Justin, no amount of cool re-branding is gonna bring that sexy back) and the jury's still out on Twitter and LinkedIn.
Facebook isn't without its faults. It's stumbled a few times on its growth path, and it doesn't always make life easy for its users. But it's evolving, and that's exactly what will shore up its future.
Facebook received an early birthday present in the late hours of Wednesday night after it was revealed the social networking
Beleaguered Facebook stock was given a small boost this week after the social media site announced the launch of Gifts, a
Facebook's floatation on to the choppy waters of the Nasdaq hasn't exactly made for a comfortable time at Menlo Park. The handling of the launch, the lawsuits, and most of all the fallingshare price has made the social network more a subject for public speculation than at any time in the company's history - which is going some, for an internet poster-child like Facebook. But for marketers, the pressure on Facebook isn't all bad news.
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has lost about $4.7bn on paper in six days after the company's stock crashed on a series of
Facebook's stock price fell to an all-time low after it announced its first earnings report since going public. Shares in
Facebook owns an incredible amount of information about, and created by, its users and as a result data security is key to maintain confidence in the site. A significant data breach would mean a PR backlash, regulatory investigations and civil liability to its users for negligence and other causes of action.