factory farms

An extraordinarily large number of negative changes in farming take place largely unseen and often completely unremarked
Nearly all the 4.9million pigs reared in Britain at any one time are kept on intensive units in distressing conditions. From the gigantic to the ramshackle, these factory farms have one thing in common: they thwart all natural instincts of the pig.
In 2010 I saw the documentary 'Food Inc.' at BAFTA - a deeply unflattering look inside America's corporate-controlled food industry and its knock-on effects to the country's farmers and the health of its citizens. The film showed that the Big Food corporations put their vast profits way above a nation's health and that this is happening on a global basis.
Over the past 20 years I have filmed inside countless factory farms and I have always felt that if I could only take people there - into the farms - so they can see how animals are treated like mere machines, people would stop eating them. Virtual reality has now made this possible and we intend to bring this experience to as many people as we can.
So many times I have seen where charities, groups and movements fighting the same cause, wanting identical results refuse to pull together through differing opinions, politics and egos, but sadly, no matter what the issue, unless we can unite for what we are fighting for, world leaders and governments will always have the upper hand.
It's a myth peddled to children from an exceptionally young age; before they can walk or talk, with colourful picture books showing happy animals grazing by duck ponds in lush green fields. In these story books the farmer and his wife are a picture of health - their bonny children and a mischievous-looking dog at their sides.
In 1992, Craig went into chicken farming to feed his family and be his own boss. He soon found he was anything but. And, after 22 years of farming, he has done something no one has done before. He gave us, two long-standing animal welfare advocates, unrestricted access to his farm where he raises chickens for US poultry giant Perdue...
For a generation of consumers shielded from the realities of factory farming, brought up on picture-book images of Old Macdonald and his small farmyard idyll, reinforced by advertising and often misleading labels, the truth often comes as a shock. Putting farm animals back on the farm could be a big vote-winner too; many people mistakenly think it's where they are anyway!
Last night I went to see the movie 'Elysium' and, apart from all the head-whirling action and natty technological advances, the one thing that nagged me pretty much all the way through was that the whole premise reminded me of a blog I read on Digg earlier in the week.
Leaving aside the discussion about whether or not in vitro meat (IVM) is capable of reducing (non-human animal) suffering; reducing environmental impact and positively affecting human health, in vitro meat is likely to be an expensive item for quite some time. Plant-based (vegan) diets on the other hand are already readily available and need not be expensive.