femininity

Last month I had to go and get my fingerprints taken. Unfortunately, the machine was struggling to read my prints. Apparently, this is quite common and the lady operating it suggested I put some hand-cream on as this makes it easier for the machine to scan the prints, as she gestured to my oversized handbag, fully expecting me to whip some out!
I was continuously put down for being very effeminate and gender non conforming for the most part. It is only in the last few years that my gender expression conforms in certain ways. Claiming that trans women have not faced misogyny for most part of their lives is simply a generalisation that is not realistic to make.
However, should we as a society be concerned about the implications of this? Do such adverts really contribute to a culture of body shaming which places unrealistic expectations on young women and girls? And, if such adverts are to be removed or censored, where do we draw the line?
With women making up 45% of all competitors and a record high of 47.5% of events open to female athletes, this year's Olympic
I believe that as women we should give Theresa May an opportunity to prove she is what this country needs. Still, a second female Prime Minister should excite us. We may not be exactly where we want to be but we're on our way there. Surely each small step we take towards progress is a step worth celebrating.
A couple of weeks ago, I listened to some guy on Radio 2 expressing his point of view on masculinity and the topic of men crying. Real men don't cry, he said. "There are plenty of things that bring a lump to my throat, but that doesn't mean I'm going to start blubbing like a little girl." Wow.
After a few years of coaching and helping hundreds of individuals, I want to share my insights into what coaching is for me and why I believe it can help you become the very best version of yourself.
A positive body image campaigner has shaved her head in the name of cancer awareness. Leyah Shanks, 22, hopes to challenge
Almost a century ago, a dark and skinny girl of illegitimate birth dreamed about becoming an actress in her country's capital, Buenos Aires. Her name was María Eva Duarte (later "Eva Perón"). Not only did Eva Perón realize this childhood dream by achieving nationwide fame as a successful actress in her early youth, she also dramatically turned into a major player on the world's stage as the First Lady of Argentina.
Most women dream of an hourglass figure – but for Kelly Lee Dekay sculpting her waist has become an obsession. Inspired by