fibromyalgia

So the purpose of this blog is to see the funny side of life. Life may be very difficult right now but I still have my sense of humour. I can only compare my life at the moment to one of a slug. I spend most of my time horizontal and moving slowly from room to room. The difference is I have arms so while I may feel as useless as a slug right now I still have the ability to type.
Chronic pain is also often invisible, and as such it can be difficult for people to explain to their loved ones or health care professionals, putting up a barrier to getting the right support and treatments.
My friends had known about my struggle to have independence and had sympathised when I was turned down for Disability Living Allowance (wrongly turned down: I've since, thank goodness, been accepted). But they went further than just supporting me on the internet. They did something about it.
Endometriosis has been at my side for 20 years, chronic fatigue for a decade, and fibromyalgia has joined the party more recently. Rather than be held hostage by symptoms which can sometimes be crippling, I am aware that my business successes have my circumstances to thank, in part, for my ability to succeed.
Last week the Daily Mail featured a letter written by Paul and Jennifer Tonks; it told the inspiring story of how Jennifer had been diagnosed with ME by a Professor in Nottingham and was so severely affected that she was dependent on a wheelchair for three years... until she took the Lightning Process, about seven years ago now, and has been well ever since.
Pain creates tension in the body, which feeds back into the brain, which responds by turning up the 'volume' on its pain amplifiers, creating even more suffering.
Imaging studies show that mindfulness soothes the brain patterns underlying pain and, over time, these changes take root and alter the structure of the brain itself, so that patients no longer feel pain with the same intensity. Many say that they barely notice it at all.
Jenny Lee has undergone a total of 59 plastic surgery operations in her lifetime in a bid to combat her cripplingly low self
Appearances are deceiving. You can't judge a person's eligibility for sickness benefit by looking at him or her. So don't do it.
A report into the effectiveness of the complementary therapies that are commonly used for treating arthritis and other musculoskeletal