fighting malaria

Over the years game-changing research and development in the malaria field has given us long-lasting insecticide treated nets that protect millions of families every night.
Malaria has been a persistent blight for thousands of years. Spread by mosquitos, the oldest surviving records of the disease appear in ancient Chinese medical texts dating back to 2,700 BC. Since that time, efforts to tame it have been equally tireless.
Students in my class still get ill from the disease, but it's much less common. I can teach without so many disruptions and my pupils perform better as a result. I give frequent health talks, especially on malaria mosquito net use, and teach adolescent health and life skills. Hopefully the students will pass on this knowledge as they grow up too.
It's true what they say, there is strength in numbers. And we are committed to building a network of malaria champions with business leaders, philanthropists, innovators, decision makers and governments to combine efforts and win the battle against malaria once and for all.
Our generation can be proud of what is being achieved across global development - and the malaria fight is the poster child for what has been done and what could be. In the first half of the twenty first century there is the possibility of the eradication of the biggest disease in human history.
The Thai-Cambodian border is a known hotspot for the emergence of drug resistant malaria and recently resistance to the most effective drug for treating malaria, artemisinin, has been discovered in this area.
As the 2015 deadline for the Millennium Development Goals draws closer, World Malaria Day is a key advocacy date for those of us working on the ground to drive the achievement of the health-related goals, especially in the malaria endemic countries of sub-Saharan Africa.
Malaria is obstinate. A massive effort by the international community along with the determination of committed individuals, scientists, health workers , governments, charities and other organisations have made a huge dent on its impact. Globally, cases are down 25%, deaths are down 42% since 2000 - but malaria is far from gone.
On 23 September, the UK Government announced its contribution to the Global Fund and we got a step closer to the day when no child dies from Aids, TB or malaria. The UK has pledged £1billion over the next three years - providing the overall target of $15billion is met from other governments and donors.
As World Malaria Day is marked this week, it will be an opportunity to celebrate the significant progress that's been made, but it will also be a time to question why there are still so many challenges in trying to eradicate this deadly disease.
Scientists in Britain have welcomed news that a trial of a vaccine for malaria has halved the number of cases in young children