flexible work schedules

But just how do parents explain a short spell of baby-making and toddler-rearing without potential future employers simply writing us off as either out of the game, or that we'll just be incredibly needy employee's demanding the working world revolve around our sproglets?
It's 37 minutes past seven in the evening and I'm wondering if I should write about a slightly taboo topic. Taboo because no-one wants to receive the backlash of opinions when speaking for or against single parenthood!
When I was growing up, we had a timetable of classes that we had to stick to, now we have a schedule that we supposedly create, but really are often at the mercy of our children and partner's plans. How can we put the things that we really want to do in the schedule and make sure that we have time for us?
I don't understand why I should not get to choose the type of contract I enter into with my employer - why should the unions and courts decide for me? I'm not a child that needs to be told what's best for me.
Politicians and business leaders talk a lot about boardroom quotas, pay equality and diversity. But the issue of helping women return to work is not yet on our agenda and it needs to be. We need more women returning to the workplace to increase the pool at the top, achieve true gender equality and inspire younger generations.
I think flexible working is the new way forward and for us and our market, it is the only way forward. Now is the time for employers to be brave, to seize the opportunity and embrace the future model of working. Flexible working is not just about a better work/life balance, but about making us all - employees and businesses alike - more effective.
In recent weeks, we have celebrated International Women's Day and mused over Lord Davies' latest 'Women on Boards' report. 'Women in the workplace' has been a topic right at the top of the global agenda...
For both men and women to truly 'have it all' we need flexibility in the way we work so that we can take better care of our own needs and those of our children. This is vital not only to help prevent burnout of the workforce but also to prevent the burnout of our children.
"Work to live, don't live to work" is a phrase often heard when trying to achieve that elusive work-life balance. But while
A recent study by Robert Half UK, revealed that nearly a third of UK HR directors cite 'inability to balance personal and professional commitments' as the primary reason for employee burnout. Could the new UK government legislation offering flexible working rights for all help make a difference?
Millions of Britons will now be able to get out of the office thanks to new government reforms allowing people to embrace
While employers can refuse the request if it is considered detrimental to business interests - for example, it may incur extra staff costs - the right to appeal is also built into the guidelines and feedback is mandatory, giving employees the opportunity to demonstrate why their request should be granted. If organised properly, flexible working hours CAN be good for business.
There continues to be much conversation about the lack of women reaching senior leadership roles and rightly so. As a nation, despite the many and varied diversity initiatives which businesses have introduced, we still don't seem to be making much progress.
There is no such thing as a '9-5 routine' any more states one respondent and the survey results indicate that flexible working is becoming more common than ever before to fit around our other responsibilities - not just children but other dependents.
Research has shown 13% of organisations in the capital adopted a more flexible approach to working during the Olympic Games. This was largely welcomed, with 77% of workers saying they were in favour of the measures.