Flooding

In recent days, over 1,000 people have died across South Asia with a staggering 41 million people affected. People have lost their homes, crops and livelihoods. Flooding has seen more than a third of Bangladesh submerged. Health facilities, roads, schools and markets are under water. More rain is forecast and the situation could yet get worse.
In the early morning of Monday 14th August, roads in the Sierra Leone capital of Freetown turned into rivers and houses were washed away after a heavy night of rain caused chaos. Hundreds of people were buried alive in a mudslide that swept through some of the poorest communities in Freetown. As the death toll continues to rise, the international community must respond.
A woman and her child on their way to collect clean water in the village of Nerculo, Niassa, Mozambique. WaterAid/ Panos
February 2nd is World Wetlands Day - and it's almost as exciting as Christmas for those of us who study and work in these
As a scientist who has followed developments on global warming for nearly 30 years I am dismayed at the number of trees and flowers blossoming as the Christmas lights go up. Nature is confused and it is an indicator of just how warm the world has become.
giving back.jpg By 7am the river was in full flood and flowing over the bridge deck. The flooding stretched for over a mile. I have seen water on the bridge before but never as much as that night. The river had risen over 3 feet in a few hours and we had an anxious wait as river levels continued to rise.
We therefore need to look at a far more holistic approach where flood management, climate change, communities and development are looked at as one and inter-linking. This simple development could start to create real change in flood-effected societies and how government prepares areas to flooding.
The choices and investment decisions we make now will determine whether or not a liveable planet is safeguarded for future generations. Tackling climate change and mitigating floods is a chance to show that we can work with nature, harnessing its energies for the good of the planet and its people, rather than hoping we can solve our environmental problems by kicking against it.
The Joburg storms and how to deal with them in the future
Today we see Haiti ripped apart even more so than ever before, and now we must look to how future preparedness schemes across the world could halt such tragedies as those happening in Haiti happening to any other countries ever again into the future.