Free Expression

I am working in the lobby at my hotel when I see a bus draped in Eritrean flags stop for a red light. Not much later, I sit on a bus heading to the airport to pick up my cousin Abie. I pass a park filled with people all dressed in the colors of the Eritrean flag. When I walk on the streets I hear my native language being spoken everywhere around me.
Join me, friends, as I take you through what I think political correctness gets wrong, how it threatens the gains in the rights of women, gay people and minorities, and what we can do to make it right.
For me the debate about whether the statue of Cecil Rhodes at Oriel College, Oxford should be removed encapsulates the crux of the debate and whilst many recognise that there are things to be commended in the arguments made on both sides I find myself agreeing with both sides, at the same time.
The arrogance of those staying away is breathtaking. PEN exists to speak out for writers who are persecuted and threatened. As Salman Rushdie said, he hopes no one ever goes after the writers staying away. Still, it is easier to piss on dead cartoonists than to stand up to ISIS who crucify and behead.
In the last few weeks EU and US talks have resulted in calls for internet providers to create a means for 'swift reporting' and removal of material that aims to incite hatred and terror - a 'reporting' mechanism which could be used to stifle legitimate, albeit often highly distasteful or offensive, speech without due process safeguards.
Platform is valuable commodity and the supply of privileged platforms far outstrips demand. This is precisely because very few people have the former while almost everyone has, at some point, availed themselves of one of the latter.
Yes, free expression is a right. One that's enshrined in the Universal Declaration Of Human Rights no less. But as has already been pointed out by more learned people than me, it's a right that comes with many caveats.
I cannot speak for Ahmed Merabet, but as a Muslim he may well have been offended by some of Charlie Hebdo's material. Regardless of this, he still gave his life to protect their right to free speech. In my opinion, this attitude is something we can all learn from.
The Prophet Mohammed, with a tear in his eye, is on the front cover of the first Charlie Hebdo edition published since Islamic
The last decade has seen massive, global technological change, creating a multitude of opportunities to strengthen the protection of the right to freedom of expression and information.