free press

At this juncture in our fragile democracy we need to support journalists.
Shortly after Trump was elected, and periodically since, my grandmother has asked - nay, begged - me to be careful about what I write. She was concerned the president, or his cronies, would target me. I had written it off as her typical overprotectiveness, but after the last week's events, I no longer can.
In the past, authoritarian regimes and unscrupulous governments have gone to great lengths to engineer actual events in order to justify their subsequent actions in the eyes of their people. But today, in the world of alternative facts and fake news, where the media is portrayed as the enemy of the People, fictional atrocities can be created at will - and the faithful will believe that they really happened.
Standing in the shadow of the attack on Charlie Hebdo and western norms we need to learn from and implement those principles of free speech that Hitchens advocated.
During the Arab Spring, the ongoing Syrian revolution and now the war in Gaza, I find myself to be more of a political activist than an "impartial" journalist because I do not see how I can "sit on the fence" when injustices are taking place right before my eyes. Am I at risk of being criminalised for mixing my political views and how I report news?
Blogging is big business. As media moves increasingly away from paper, and onto our screens, Google has empowered bloggers.
owever powerful the pressure to conform, to take the cheque and keep quiet, there will always be those who, moved by injustice, will speak out. But it counts for little, unless we all speak out together.
CNN has been blocked in China after cameras captured police "kicking, punching and pushing" a reporter who was covering the
A university removed student newspapers from corridors in time for an open day because the front page criticised the institution's
A British journalist is in intensive care in a Sri Lankan hospital after being shot in what a senior United Nations official