free speech

Aimed at the younger end of the voting demographic, I was soon pondering as to why a youth based political show hadn't come to fruition sooner. With a blissfully simple premise, and from the makers of Question Time, I had high hopes for the show.
On 13 March 2012, the Mexican Senate approved an amendment to the law that would make any attack on journalists a federal
I'm not suggesting that Twitter is obliged to take responsibility for delivering international social progress in the form of free speech. But its global reach and impact are massive. Its leadership has serious negotiating power and can make bold decisions.
If Saudi Arabia executes Hamza, it will be in the name of perpetuating its fundamentally un-islamic political oppression and nothing to do with the compassionate model of the Prophet, whose name they claim to be acting upon.
A humanist politician in Ireland is trying to prosecute a Catholic bishop for hate speech. Fine Gael election candidate John
For better or worse, the notoriety of the internet stepped up a notch last year. Civil unrest was a common theme in the news - not just here in the UK, but throughout the world - the US had the Occupy movements, we had 'the riots' and of course, Arabic countries had the Arab Spring. The resounding driving force behind these events? Social networking.
Turkey has surpassed the likes of China, Iran and Russia, when it comes to the number of journalists/authors in prison, many of whom are being held without charge.
As the internet swarms with reaction to Ofcom's decision to take Press TV off the Sky platform in the UK, the channel is further discrediting itself by ignoring the claims of foul play. Instead of taking the necessary steps to stay on air and protect its employees, Press TV claims this is the end of free speech in Britain.
Section 5 of the Public Order Act 1986 is a menace to free speech and the right to protest. It has been repeatedly abused by over-zealous police and prosecutors, to variously arrest gay rights campaigners, Christian street preachers, critics of Scientology and even students making jokes.
Racism, by definition, is advocating or teaching the superiority of one race over another. When talking about this we usually bring up the example of Nazi Germany, which made racism a state practice. But is discussing race or bringing race up when talking about certain issues also racism?
Journalists have rarely ranked high in the affections of the British public. Occasionally venerated for noble efforts abroad or campaigns at home, they are mostly left to languish alongside society's bottom feeders - politicians, for example, or estate agents.
Having promised that UCL would ensure free speech for everyone, not just religious-extremists, Malcolm Grant's institution now prevents an advocate for democracy and Israel from speaking on its campus.
It is so important to hate Jeremy Clarkson for the right reasons. Doing so on ridiculous grounds just spoils it for the rest of us. I say this assuming you do hate him, which I don't recommend. It only encourages him.
Poppy-burning may become for Britain what flag-burning is for the US: a hot-button issue that divides the country along what
So could the closure of Wikileaks end up generating a new type of journalist? One that has the freedom to release the other half of the story, one that has the freedom to speak the whole truth and nothing but the truth? I certainly hope so, and believe that we are seeing it already.
I am a Jesus-loving, Bible-believing, salvation-emphasising Christian, and I support freedom of speech. That may seem odd if you follow depictions of Christians of my particular tribe in the media.
The trouble in the east end of London at the weekend is evidence of English Defence League's intolerance but also the intolerance of the UAF and their unwilling to hold a political discourse with members of the far-right.
How could you not feel a twinge of sympathy for a decent chap like Jonathan May-Bowles of Edinburgh Gardens, Windsor, being sent down for simply carrying out a stunt?
Any dangerous attempts at state censorship of the press should rightly be resisted with the help of Article 10, which guarantees free speech. But whatever happens in the future, press tirades against our modern British Bill of Rights - the Human Rights Act, which protects dignity, equal treatment and fairness for everyone - will ring rather hollow from now on.