Frieze Art Fair

I am standing in the new Nineties section at the Frieze Art Fair, making a beeline for the Anthony Reynolds stand for Richard
Frieze is arriving and the art world seems set to eats its own tail. Artists are painfully aware that the process of gentrification, where local residents are priced out of their area begins with them.
The most striking show of the season - and possibly the year - is currently to be found at David Zwirner's Mayfair gallery, where Kerry James Marshall has staged, "Look See," his first solo show in the city since 2005.
It is a strange moment. I do not know where to go or what to see. There is so much going on that it seems easier to stay in bed and pull the covers up over my head and sing nursery rhymes. Frieze is in town and it has two identities - Frieze and Frieze Masters.
I am feeling slightly sheepish about my previous post. I was griping about the how full on and (implied) uncreative Frieze Art Fair can be. Little did I know that I clearly wasn't the only person who thought that because this years' fair, currently being touted as the 'best Frieze ever' for visitors, was a very different viewing experience.
Whether you are going to spend this week hobnobbing and chugging champagne in Mayfair or checking out street art at Moniker in Brick Lane this is when the art world descends on London and when London's art scene shows the world exactly what it is made of... So, if you can, get out there and experience it!
My first time in NY I had a terrible row. A director of Mallett at that time - it was 1996 - on arrival I was daunted by my first experience of serious jet lag. It was stupid o'clock in the morning, as far as I was concerned, when I sat down to dinner with my then boss Lanto Synge.
Due to a bout of flu, a mugging and a head injury (all healed now) my impressions are slightly late but I hope they are enjoyed by some.
The heavy wagons of the contemporary art world have rumbled into London. Christies and Sotheby's have punched sales up, with
Sluice art fair is completely different from the usual clean white visual aesthetic of modern art fairs, where sales are paramount and visual clutter to be avoided.