Funding

Of all the Tory manifesto pledges that are likely to be junked by the new government, the 'dementia tax' pledge on funding care will get some of the biggest cheers.
Care vouchers would not support integration and would make paying for care even more complex than it currently is. It's not the long-term solution that older and disabled people and their families desperately need.
Back in 2010 the coalition government asked Andrew Dilnot to lead a commission on care funding. He duly reported in 2011 with his proposals including a cap on the cost of care. The government - rightly in my opinion - then in 2015 decided not to implement the cap, set at £72,000, and 'postponed' its implementation until 2020.
Council tax bills have landed on doormats and across the country most households face higher charges to pay for care for older and disabled people.
The government has recognised that care is in crisis. The Budget has provided some more 'sticking plaster' emergency funding for care via local authorities. How that £2 billion will be distributed and used over the next three years remains to be seen.
How much further can we go before we are forced to admit that continuously saving money could mean we have to rescue education? The conversation must continue, but its focus needs to change. Let's stop talking about cuts and start talking about investment.
By all means have a debate on whether we should raise more taxation from income or wealth, but let's do it as part of a debate about government finances. Enough of the dead cats and red herrings! It's time for a new vision for better care and support.
The media has become very vocal on both the worldly threats to everyone, and also have their own strange take on disability
On 8 March the Chancellor must show that he understands both the immediate care crisis and the need for a radical and sustainable long term solution. Older and disabled people and their families and carers have been waiting too long for the answer. Let's hope that their expectations aren't dashed yet again.
For the first time ever, 2017 is set to see more elderly people requiring care and support, than there are families to provide it. This is topped by an ageing population and a rapidly rising life expectancy, placing greater demands on care services across the country.