Gaddafi

'We feared Mugabe would be dragged through streets like Gaddafi,' says ex-spokesperson.
The starting place for any democratic decisions about how we balance our rights to freedom against the need to compromise that freedom for the safety and security of the wider community should be that we should be free to do anything we want except if there is a compelling case why we should not.
Despite the outcry in recent weeks over the repeated drownings in the Mediterranean, surprisingly little has been said about the country most of the migrants and refugees are coming from: Libya. Which is odd, because the increasingly disastrous state of Libya is a key component to this tragedy.
One is white, stark, temporary, windowless. Fluorescent lights hang from its ceiling. The room is empty save for a woman, crying. She is chained to the wall and obviously pregnant. The woman in the white room comes from Morocco but has married a opponent of Col. Gaddafi, and for that reason is about to be plunged into terrors of which she knows nothing...
Despite the laughable hypocrisy, the benefits of celebrity environmentalism are obvious, even when they merely regurgitate inoffensive green buzzwords. They draw attention to unnoticed issues. They mobilise people. When they speak, we listen.
"Facebook likes do not save lives." The worrying trend of slacktivism renders social change to be a deceptively simple process. In terms of political movements like the one that Egypt, this form of online support might be detrimental to the democratic process of nation building in the long term.
A Libyan politician suing the government for damages amid claims a tip-off led to him being kidnapped and tortured in a Gaddafi
Tory MP Andrew Tyrie, chairman of the all-party group on rendition, said the Justice and Security Bill would make it more difficult to establish the truth about Britain's complicity in kidnap and torture and make us all less safe. I think he is right about that.
David Cameron says he will be arguing for human rights when he visits Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Oman this week. The stronger message, however, will be of UK support and the government's willingness to do anything to promote UK arms company interests.
Here in Mali, families are trapped in a perfect storm - the consequences of climate change and political regime change. Drought has led to a dreadful harvest and rocketing prices, whilst the departure of Gaddafi has led to migrating mercenaries, laden with arms.