Gail Dines

Feminists in the UK have dropped the ball over extreme porn legislation, a London conference has heard, with activists urged
Here is what Stop Porn Culture has to say to porn performers: Don't come to our conference to protest, come to organize with us against an industry that treats you as a commodity, when they can make a profit off of you, and then as a liability if you speak out about the harms done to you physically and emotionally.
Female pornstars can't win: they are labelled victims, and if they try to defend what they do for a living, this is taken as proof of just how 'oppressed' they are. According to SPC and Object, their voices are not worth hearing. This is why we are protesting outside the SPC conference from 3pm on Saturday 15 March.
The real great British porn experiment actually began in 1970 when an image previously described as 'porn', available only within age-restricted publications on the top shelf, was first placed in a mass circulation non age-restricted daily newspaper.
The older I get, the more I believe that 'equality' is nothing more than a smokescreen to prevent the true liberation of women. Equality before the law means nothing when violence is endemic; when women are most likely to live in poverty; when no one bothers to actually enforce the existing equality legislation.
I may be wrong but in the same way it is perceived that women may think they have to act and perform a certain way during sex because of porn, then surely the same principal can be applied to naïve or impressionable gay men, which in this case could prove dangerous
The Home Office has shown, this week, that it recognises gender inequality is a problem and education is an important part of the solution. The Scandinavians are leagues ahead. Let's put our energies into trying to catch up with them instead of denying that we have a serious problem on that front.