garment workers

From supporting small businesses to divesting.
Industry wide strategies aimed at improving labour laws are essential; only through freedom of association can the millions of voiceless individuals employed in this multi-billion dollar industry take a lasting stand against systemic injustices. There is an urgent need for both the industry and the public to hear this collective call to action.
Behind the glamour of London Fashion Week and the aspirational images in glossy magazines is the reality of the global fashion industry: a grim picture of women living in abject poverty, struggling to survive whilst making the clothes sold on UK high streets for major fashion brands.
With plus-size models becoming the norm and Karl Lagerfeld using feminist placards in Chanel's 2015 Spring show, on the surface
The grounds upon which the eight storey commercial building collapsed were swampy and the cracks on its walls were large. Garment workers were forced to go back to work knowing that this building was unsafe to work in.
I imagine that today, fashion writers around the world will be mentioning Mr. Nelson Mandela's penchant for Indonesian batik-style shirts. Let's not do that here. Instead, let's talk about his life's work for a more just, more humane world.
Please mark 24 April 2014 in your diaries as this is Fashion Revolution Day when we will come together to commemorate the first anniversary of the collapse, remember the victims of Rana Plaza and change our fashion future.
Bangladesh's garments industry, the life-line of millions of people and one of its major national export industries, is now in tatters. The government recently announced the shutdown of 18 garment factories due to safety concerns. Critics fear that the government does not have the ability or intention to bring back confidence to factory workers by robustly implementing health and safety measures in the industry.