gastronomie

The idyllic Alpbach Valley is home to authentic Tyrolean cooking, using local ingredients, and mixing tradition with new tastes and inspirations.
Architect César Manrique championed, and helped preserve, Lanzarote's unique landscape and farmers are now producing distinctive wines and cheeses from its volcanic soil.
Mallorca was one of the first destinations for package tourists and has been serving up sun, sand and sea for generations. In the quest to please international visitors, local food traditions tended to be ignored but tourists are now demanding more from their holidays.
Valencia is rightly famous for its Paella but, for one week only, many of the city's restaurants offer menus at just €20 for lunch and €30 for dinner, using the best of local ingredients.
French Canada prides itself not just on its language but also on the quality of its food - I take the train from Quebec City to the Charlevoix region and explore their Flavour Trail.
Situated in the Atlantic, West of England's Land's End, the Isles of Scilly, belonging to the Duchy of Cornwall, are everything the Great British Seaside should be. Oh, and the food is pretty good too.
Home to the highest tides in the world, the Bay of Fundy has a spectacular New Brunswick shoreline and a drive through its forests, raging capes and isolated coves may reward with a glimpse of whales.
Greek food has not enjoyed the greatest of reputations - lowlights include greasy Moussaka, fatty Kebabs and Retsina wines that taste of turpentine. But it deserves better than that. Now the island of Santorini has declared 2013 as the year of gastronomy and is showcasing its unique products.
Countries from South and Central America have been setting culinary trends recently and now Ecuador is making the running.
Most people are familiar with Burgundy wines, but neighbouring Jura produces Vin Jaune, the best wine in the world according to Napoleon.