Gaucher disease

Although I'm highly organised and like being prepared for any eventuality, I must confess of late, living with Gaucher and Parkinson's, not to mention the new four legged addition to our family, it's a job staying on top of things.
My husband has become highly adept in pushing me in my wheelchair whilst manoeuvring a large case on wheels at the same time - impressively even up and down steep inclines. This requires not only strength but the ability to steer avoiding any oncoming passengers and obstacles.
We have our work cut out for us working together with a professional trainer, and the next few months are not going to be easy, but in the long term we will end up with a well-trained companion/assistance dog who will hopefully enrich our lives, give me better quality of life and help me get through each day.
Who would have thought it possible to turn into a human volcano? I seem to defy the laws of nature; Mount Vesuvius eat your heart out! I have become a human heater, and whilst my poor husband who is nightly tormented by my malfunctioning internal thermostat, he kindly never complains.
My mother was diagnosed with vascular dementia and I was suddenly cast into the role of caregiver. The deterioration was far more advanced than I had first imagined and I witnessed this cruel disease as it left destruction in its wake.
As tough as it is for a patient to receive and come to terms with a new diagnosis, it is equally traumatic on the spouse/partner, who without any prior warning or consultation, is unceremoniously thrown into the role of caregiver. Many pick up this mantle without hesitation, out of loyalty, devotion and love, take on this arduous task.
I confess, at a loss what to do, throwing caution to the wind, I took a shot of vodka, which as you've probably guessed, did not get rid of the Parkinson symptoms. It did however relax me to a degree thereby making the situation a little more bearable with no adverse effect.
The things people do when they assume no one is watching can be heart-warming, amusing, but occasionally just down right astonishing. I've often wondered what makes some men feel they can't be seen in the car.
Having a much-loved pet put down, is one of life's unpleasant responsibilities when owning a dog. Saving an animal from unnecessary suffering, when nothing else can be done, we sometimes have to make the difficult decision, knowing it is the kind and humane thing to do.
When first diagnosed, there is a flurry of shock and interest from those you know, but slowly as they realise this is a long term disease requiring dedication, their sympathy wanes. Friends, and bizarrely, some family too, have mysteriously vanished into thin air.