Generation Change

The idea that being 30-odd is too old to pursue your passions and dreams, even if that involves a drastic change, is ludicrous. You are not yet halfway through your life. You have survived your twenties, observed yourself change and grow, and now have a better idea of who you are and what you want than ever before.
In the craziness that is our workplace today, it has been said that every answer to life can actually be found in the TV
No longer does the pub need to facilitate the lads catch up. WhatsApp and other social platforms do that for us.  We can all be watching the same football match at the same time in different parts of the country, or responding to what is happening in an episode of Game of Thrones from the comfort of our sofa and still feel like we are getting the banter, and feeling the connection to our friends.
Someone's always telling you what you ought to do. Read the papers often enough and you'll end up at once enlightened and confused. Chocolate will be part of the sugar scare one day, and will save you from strokes and heart attacks the next; red wine will give you cancer in January but save you from it in March.
There is an obsession at the moment, in the pre-millennial generations, to term today's under 30's as 'snowflakes'. A thinly veiled insult that's supposed to show up the overly delicate and sensitive nature of our post-modern society.
This generation has already set the pace by drinking and smoking less than ever before. But with the rise of obesity it is now time for young people (and their parents) to take hold of the opportunities they have and create a truly healthy life.
The generation gap is an open wound which weeps periodically, dependent on the latest national woe. Today, TV reports echo with young voices claiming the oldies have stolen their future. The young are accused of complacency, of lack of interest and low turnout.
We're neck deep in the digital age, print media is slowly becoming a thing of the past, and the way we communicate with one
Children are the greatest learners. Hopefully we will learn from our own history - the generations coming behind us will be more connected, more global and different in ways we can only imagine. However, it is clear to say that a lot of us feel let down by Thursday's decision.
Look around you. Look at the poison you have created and ask yourself, what are you leaving me? This is your legacy and, regardless of Thursday's result, my generation may well spend the rest of our lives cleaning up.