geopolitics

So let's speak up for foreign aid...even if selfishly.
Buffeted by shifting winds in South Africa, Zimbabwe, and further abroad, President Ian Khama's legacy has never been more tenuous.
"It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out; it's the pebble in your shoe" Muhammad Ali The Greatest champion
The British government learnt a valuable lesson when Premier Wen visited the UK four years ago. In the run up to that visit
Dangerous war aversion? In 1914, the global economy collapsed because the then superpowers declared war; whereas today, it
In my view, those countries with a nuclear deterrent are putting themselves more at risk from today's threats. We're not spending our money wisely. We're taking the heat off those countries without nukes. They're letting us spend the cash on Trident while they focus on what matters: tackling terrorism and stopping the growth of terrorist groups.
Without a deal between Athens and Brussels and the IMF on economic reforms and repayments of loans within the next couple of months a Grexit or Graccident would be the most extreme outcome. We cannot rule out that the parties will fail to find a solution seeing as how the Greeks are dawdling and in the light of the harsh words uttered by, among others, Germany.
This May brings a General Election more unpredictable than any in recent memory. With both major parties remaining neck and neck in the polls and the continuing strength of the fringe parties, the likelihood of an outright majority for either seems remote.
"We come together at a crossroads between war and peace; between disorder and integration; between fear and hope," said US President Obama during his address to the United Nations. Stock markets still do not feel the same urgency. There is a huge gap between geopolitical reality and the financial markets.
Monetary blinders Neither stock markets nor oil prices have responded strongly to geopolitical unrest. On the contrary, recently