George Bernard Shaw

You could be downcast, or you could look at the opportunities. Yes Ezra and Felix are right to counsel, but know this: don't wait to be asked; don't cross your arms; don't ask for permission, just do it. Here's the secret: dogged determination and a resolve to never stop.
Brand has not all the answers, nor does he claim to, but he has heart, sense, influence, and energy. Brand has re-Branded himself, and now he is re-Branding politics and activism, then selling it to young people so they will understand better that their society and its future is in their hands
What was once thought to be a political necessity has proven to be a political fiasco as Iran's mullahs' regime moves ever closer to producing a viable nuclear bomb. It is now time to put an end to this fruitless and unjust policy, and remove the terror label that was placed, unjustifiably, on the PMOI at that time.
George Bernard Shaw used to say that political necessities sometime turn out to be political mistakes. As things stand in ongoing negotiations between the West and Iran, this seems to be the parallel for what is going to happen in yet another round of talks later this month in Russia. Let us consider the current balance of actions.
The US and the UK may be, as George Bernard Shaw once said, two nations "separated by a common language," but they're definitely joined by a set of common problems: economic crises that have left millions unemployed or underemployed, an economic debate that has been hijacked by deficit and austerity hawks, and politicians with a remarkable ability to propose solutions that are actually making the problems worse. Yet in both countries, there is a movement fueled by social media, community engagement, and the growing understanding that real solutions aren't going to be coming from our politicians any time soon. So, in the meantime, millions of people in thousands of communities are taking the initiative to connect, engage and solve problems themselves.
My friend Margie threw a marvellous party last week at her flat overlooking London's swanky Manchester Square. The high-decibel, high-caloric blow-out followed the funeral service and cremation marking her death.