girls rights

Can you remember your favourite teacher? The person who introduced you to a still-cherished book, flicked a switch in your brain, or ignited a passion that years later still burns strong and bright?
If 2016 was a year of great social and political upheaval, will 2017 be the year that women and girls worldwide pay the price
Girls' lives in the UK are full of barriers, and until we remove them, these amazing women will remain the exception that proves the longstanding rule. The UK is failing girls. Every day, they face harassment in schools. They don't feel safe online. And they're scared walking home on the street.
This year our panels include discussions on feminist masculinities, combining crafting and activism, and living with mental illness. We're hosting workshops on writing poetry, getting started on YouTube, and deconstructing classism, as well as meet-ups for people interested in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and people who identify as asexual and aromantic.
To reach everyone everywhere by 2030 with safe water, decent toilets and hygiene will require coordinated efforts from governments at all levels as well as from those working on education, health and human rights. It's an ambitious goal - but the costs of failure will be even higher.
We also need to see the reality of lives girls, so often overlooked. We need to hear the voice of girls like Gema and Maya: girls with insight into the barriers, with experience of overcoming them. Because the people who are really going to change things are girls themselves.
The Commission on the Status of Women kicks off this week in New York and the movement for girls' rights is growing ever
Today is international Day of the Girl and I am already anticipating the voices of doubt that will question why we celebrate - and sound the alarm - over global girls' rights so loudly each year. And they will question why, this year in particular, the Day of the Girl shines a spotlight on adolescent girls.
We must continue to fight for the rights of workers everywhere by ensuring that no one should be coerced or forced into unsafe work - especially not children - because that is all that is available to them. The children of the Rana Plaza disaster should be managing the factories of the future and their children should have options that those brave men and women never dreamed of. We will not get there until we ensure that all children everywhere have access to an education.
Globally, marriage is not always something to celebrate. While some 350 couples a day decide to tie the knot in the UK, around the world 41,000 girls every day enter into a union they didn't choose. That's one girl every two seconds married against her will.