global aid

Already in Britain, eight out of 10 people have participated in some kind of charitable giving this year, and it is estimated that the UK will have donated more than £10.6billion to charity by the end of 2015. But how many of us know with any real certainty where our money is going, or how many people will actually see the benefit?
Syria, when it does make the news, is seen in terms of battle lines and military strategies. When civilians are forced to flee, they go wherever they think they will be safest - but often their choice is misunderstood as a declaration of allegiance to one group or another.
New figures from the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) show that global aid fell in 2011 for the first time in 14 years. The cut of nearly 3% will impede progress in reducing poverty and cost children's lives.
For many of us, the British Chancellor's annual budget announcement is a familiar ritual. We watch out for the extra couple of pence on a pint of beer or a glass of wine. We wince at the inevitable hike at the petrol pumps and wait hopefully for a few pounds back in tax credit or personal allowance. But the UK budget doesn't just matter to 60 million Brits.
If the brave reporting of the late Marie Colvin and her colleagues wasn't enough, an analogy may illuminate the moral cowardice of the international community's response in Syria.
Syrians didn't expect to be let down by the same humanity who didn't abandon their Tunisian, Egyptian and Libyan brothers. Dear so-called humanity, what makes Syrians unworthy of receiving your real support of our aspirations to live in freedom and dignity?