global entrepreneurship week

In the last fifteen years the world has been irreversibly changed by technology. People do jobs today that did not even exist when they were at school. You can now be a social media manager, a specialist on search engine optimisation or a sales executive for online advertising.
As Director of a multi-award-winning UK social enterprise I get asked this question at least few times a week and have been
In a country where young people make up a significant proportion of the available labour force, yet unemployment rates for 20 to 24yearolds have been estimated to be as much as five times greater than those for older adults, Building Young Futures works hard to support hard to reach people in places where there are few jobs or prospects for the bulging youth population. What's the alternative?
A little while ago reports of the UK's entrepreneurial efforts in the face of start-up giants like the US, were, well, a little mediocre. It was rather like reading an end of year report which said 'must try harder'.
Rather than looking for similarities and differences between different countries, personally I'd rather hear about how entrepreneurs in different countries are being brought together and how knowledge, skills and opportunities are being shared across national borders which, let's face it, in this global, digital world don't actually mean that much.
One week, 3,200 events and over 300,000 participants. It's been a record-breaking Global Entrepreneurship Week 2013 for the UK, with more people taking part in activities than ever before in the 10-year history of a week dedicated to enterprise in the country.
What a long way we have come. I can remember when we administered the first £1million. It seemed like a huge milestone. It seems like only yesterday we had provided loans to 5,000 businesses and now we have passed the 10,000th milestone. We should be very proud of what we have achieved, but there is still a long way to go...
Alastair Crawford's big business idea came after he effectively predicted the internet. Crawford, who had dropped out of
Matt Hermer left behind a decade-long career in finance when he decided to take over his local bar and turn it into a new
Wherever you are in the world, micro and small businesses play a crucial role in job creation and the growth and prosperity of their local economies and, particularly in developing markets, poverty alleviation...
Celia Sawyer made her name as a glamorous dealer on Channel 4's "Four Rooms", which saw members of the public pitch odd trinkets
Britain's entrepreneurs have come together to form their own supergroup, the "Entrepreneur's Alliance", in order to better
Realising the entrepreneur within could be the act of turning your passion or hobby into a business, spotting a gap in the market and fund-raising to fill it, or coming up with a new way of working or product line for a company in which you're an employee. The entrepreneurial instinct, I believe, is in everyone - the only thing that differs is what you decide to do with it.
Foreign entrepreneurs contribute "disproportionately" to the British economy and create jobs, according to serial entrepreneur
Britons have been urged to seize on the improving state of the economy and start their own business, as new research to mark
Vince Cable has dismissed David Cameron's "utterly wrong" claim that the coalition has been forced to do things that were
You know things are starting to look up with the economy when debate turns to possible interest rate rises. With recent unemployment and GDP figures suggesting the long-awaited upturn may well be here, it was with great pleasure that we were able to announce, at the launch of Global Entrepreneurship Week 2013, that entrepreneurs agree a new era is afoot.
Making Global Entrepreneurship Week 2013 even more significant, this year will mark 10 years of a week in the U.K. dedicated to giving individuals and start ups the practical support to help them get set up and grow.
Supporting entrepreneurship is undoubtedly a positive and practical choice, however there are many women across developing countries who don't receive any encouragement or support. As a result, these women are unable to pursue their dreams and a major source of growth is left untapped.
In today's uncertain economic climate, aspiring entrepreneurs would be forgiven for thinking that it is too risky and too complicated to start up their own business. Yet, as Global Entrepreneurship Week takes place, it is clear that this is not necessarily the case - and in fact now could be the perfect time to consider setting up.