Global Fund to Fight AIDS TB and Malaria

This World Malaria Day we have the opportunity to continue to dismantle malaria's grip on African households and indeed entire economies. In doing so, we will help release the potential of future generations to flourish and move our world decisively to a healthier, more stable and prosperous future.
2013 has been a year of tremendous progress for the malaria campaign globally and locally. We are delighted with the UK cross party support for the malaria campaign. Parliamentarians can see the value of sustaining its prosecution, and the public appear to share our conviction that it is unacceptable in the twenty first century for children to die for want of treatment costing less than £1...
After my meetings with government officials I'm of the view that the HIV/AIDS scenario in Romania and countries that find themselves in a similar funding situation will not change in the coming months or indeed, years...
This week's news that the UK government would contribute £1billion to the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria for the next three years surprised many Global Fund lobbyists who didn't expect to get what they asked for.
On 23 September, the UK Government announced its contribution to the Global Fund and we got a step closer to the day when no child dies from Aids, TB or malaria. The UK has pledged £1billion over the next three years - providing the overall target of $15billion is met from other governments and donors.
The debate about the quantity of Britain's aid budget was settled earlier this year when the government delivered on its promise to invest 0.7% of our national income in fighting poverty and disease - a decision that, contrary to what the cynics insist, had the support of the majority of British people.
As World Malaria Day is marked this week, it will be an opportunity to celebrate the significant progress that's been made, but it will also be a time to question why there are still so many challenges in trying to eradicate this deadly disease.
At 13, the only dream Ganesh has, is to live. His parents and brother - all died of AIDS. Of the family of four, he is now the only survivor and HIV positive. Ganesh got HIV from his mother and is among more than 100,000 children below the age of 15 who are living with HIV/AIDS in India.