Global Fund

At Malaria No More UK, we know the importance of sustaining this momentum. We will continue to inspire the public, protect those most at risk and build partnerships with people and organisations who share our vision of a malaria-free world. And to borrow a hashtag from the Global Fund's inspiring replenishment campaign, this time lets stay united to #EndItForGood.
As the Rio Olympics draw to a close, tomorrow's World Mosquito Day provides a timely reminder of the deadly threat posed
2013 has been a year of tremendous progress for the malaria campaign globally and locally. We are delighted with the UK cross party support for the malaria campaign. Parliamentarians can see the value of sustaining its prosecution, and the public appear to share our conviction that it is unacceptable in the twenty first century for children to die for want of treatment costing less than £1...
I approached Juba with trepidation. In the few years since I last came it has become the capital of the world's youngest country and everyone that visits keeps telling me how quickly it is changing.It was also the city chosen by the African Union to commemorate World AIDS Day earlier this month.
On 23 September, the UK Government announced its contribution to the Global Fund and we got a step closer to the day when no child dies from Aids, TB or malaria. The UK has pledged £1billion over the next three years - providing the overall target of $15billion is met from other governments and donors.
The debate about the quantity of Britain's aid budget was settled earlier this year when the government delivered on its promise to invest 0.7% of our national income in fighting poverty and disease - a decision that, contrary to what the cynics insist, had the support of the majority of British people.
David Cameron has identified other priorities for this summit - trade, tax and transparency - and will host a pre-meeting focused on world hunger. These are all vital issues, but the Prime Minister also needs to protect what has already been achieved and should encourage the G8 to deliver on past promises.
Thursday is World Malaria Day - a moment to reflect on the enormous global efforts taking place to rid the world of this terrible disease. It's also a poignant reminder of all those who have lost their lives to malaria, including my son Harry who died in 2005.
We were with Richard Curtis for a screening of his latest film Mary and Martha. It's a story about two mothers who have nothing in common except their shared loss of their sons through malaria. I was there because I share their story, I lost my son Harry to malaria and my own experience is reflected in the character of Martha.
As the 900 babies born with HIV every day remind us, women and girls shoulder an unfair burden of the HIV epidemic. Yet over the past three decades I have worked on this, many of the vital struggles around stigma, discrimination, sexism and marginalisation have simply not moved.