Goodluck Jonathan

The uncanny parallels that merge the two countries of Nigeria and Great Britain are truly mind-boggling. The historical coming together of both entities about three centuries ago has somehow resulted in a weird morphing of the most unlikely national psyches.
Unquestionably the most closely-fought in Nigeria's turbulent history, Nigeria's presidential elections on 28th March offer both promise and peril for Africa's most populous country.
Boko Haram may not have produced imagery that has travelled across the media landscape, burning iconic pictures into the minds of those of us in the West. But by interrupting the political process and denying ordinary Nigerians the chance for peace with a delay of even one day, Boko Haram has proven itself just as terrifying.
And so on the very day the rest of the world will be celebrating love, some bright sparks in Nigeria decided it was the perfect day for the country's two main political tribes to go to war. Surprised? Well, not really, I guess. We are Nigerians after all and everything we do must have our stamp of uniqueness and creativity.
I began negotiating a deal with my former employers (an international news channel) and the Nigerian Ministry of Tourism to produce a show that would show the outside world another side to my homeland. Then, that was all scuppered by Boko Haram ramping up their deadly campaign.
Due to ineptitude, corruption and indiscriminate violence, the military is one of the causes of the insurgency, which now forms a strategic part of an arc of jihadism that stretches from Algeria to Somalia. Giving funds and resources to the Nigerian armed forces risks exacerbating the problem. Boko Haram thrives on the endemic corruption that has characterised post-independence Nigeria.
Is Nigeria intending to negotiate the release of the 276 kidnapped schoolgirls or it preparing to attack Boko Haram? The answer to this question does not seem clear, even to the Nigerian government itself. Throughout much of the crisis the administration of president Goodluck Jonathan has dropped fat hints that it is engaging or attempting to engage in some kind of behind-the-scenes dialogue with the kidnappers.
Barack Obama has pledged the US will do "everything we can" to help Nigeria find hundreds of abducted schoolgirls - as another
William Hague has offered to help Nigeria secure the release of more than 200 schoolgirls kidnapped by Islamist militant
Boko Haram will "sell your girls in the market", the terrorist leader has vowed in a chilling video message to parents of