Greece austerity

A youth-driven Brexit could play the initial role in dismantling the EU, and without this disintegration any hope for social progress may become much more distant. For the sake of the youth, you only live once: vote for exit! Or as I should say, YOLOEXIT.
Achieving ever-closer-union, as it foreshadowed, has been the driving force behind the gradual (and often forceful) assimilation of law, currency and culture across the European continent. To many, it seemed a wonderful way of enhancing international cooperation, and promoting both peace and unity.
Germany is in an invidious position. It outstrips its fellow Europeans. It knows how to run a successful economy at a time when most European economies are lame and dependent on high levels of government support. It knows and demonstrates that hard work and fiscal maturity rewards all. Unfortunately it does not understand its own history and the history of Europe. It does not understand that the Germanic grabbing of Europe in two world wars has screwed with the economies and cultures of Europe.
The current Greek government won the elections under the slogan "Hope is Coming". Is "hope" seeing our grandparents crying and dying in front of ATM machines? Is "hope" people literally threatening to kill their brothers over political disagreements? Is "hope" a government that cannot take responsibility for their mistakes?
What kind of system have we created where our elite inflict austerity on ordinary people that causes misery and suffering to millions, while financiers and gamblers of financial markets enjoy such a bonanza of riches? The mind boggles.
With Podemos, Spain's left-wing anti-austerity movement, making dramatic gains in the local and regional elections, a discernible
Greece's Alexis Tsipras has embarked on a European tour to win support for his economic agenda. European leaders should engage constructively with his proposals. There are many good economic arguments for Tsipras plans but the main reason to make concessions to Greece is a lesson from the politics of the Great Depression.
Syriza may turn out to be the solution that so many Greeks have been desperately searching for. That said, it wouldn't surprise me if some of the locals I know are currently saving a few Drachmas under the mattress, you know, just in case...
Anti-austerity party Syriza has swept into power in Greece, with leader Alexis Tsipras now leading a coalition government
There is a sense of abandon, when walking in downtown Athens today. Open drug use within a view of the nation's parliament, an alarming surge in HIV infections and a total collapse of the health system and all safety nets are signs of a society that its priorities are out of balance.