grexit

I'm not going to claim we're out of the woods yet; there's a long way to go till the fruits of independence are laid bare. For starters, we're certainly not going to be spending that phantom £350million anytime soon (if it even proves to exist). But seeing people write off a historic opportunity on the basis of one day's events is absolutely crackers.
Neither a partial nor a complete erosion of Schengen would represent a fatal blow to the EU, but either would be damaging. There would be a direct economic impact on member states seeking to restore control of their borders...
The third Greek bailout deal has prompted a predictably mixed response in the British media, from positivity and cautious
Should people who live outside of Greece express strong opinions on whether Greece should stay or exit the eurozone? I, for one, feel that I am not entitled to express such strong opinions. Having a strong opinion, of course, is one thing. Expressing it, is another. I object to the second, and this is why in all my encounters and discussions about Greece, I apologetically provide caveats of my privileged position in this debate.
The sun may be shining now, but unless the roof is fixed, the storm clouds on the horizon remain ominous. This is an opportunity for Britain to lead by example, work with its European partners, and make the case for a more competitive, flexible Europe for all of its citizens. The alternative is continued national, regional, and global stagnation, if not outright decline.
Already before Eurozone leaders reached a final agreement on the third bailout package for Greece, the hashtag #ThisIsACoup
The new bailout deal signals Greece's capitulation to its creditors, something which has important ramifications for the bailout's success. Even if the deal makes it through the Greek parliament in the coming weeks, the programme's economic incoherence will make it fall apart.
There is still a "major issue of trust" between the Greek government and its international creditors, the head of the eurozone's
The Greek parliament has backed government proposals for economic reforms in the hope of ending the country's debt crisis
When did those people who have more than enough for their needs decide that they are no longer under any obligation to share their good fortune? Germany sees no need to help Greece; George Osborne sees no reason why the government - acting on behalf of those of us who are doing all right - should help provide a decent chance to those who are not...