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A new era has begun for the World Health Organization (WHO) and the stakes are as high as they have ever been. With the transition
Nobody can yet comprehend the legacy that the current Ebola outbreak will leave. But that should galvanise us into action - it shows why 2015 must be the year to strengthen health systems and support innovative solutions that secure healthier lives and livelihoods.
When Britain is congratulated for doing something extraordinary you want to hear what it is we've done... Mr Gates robustly applauded the UK's historic contributions to global health through its strong commitment to overseas aid. This can be seen with the UK's current response to the Ebola crisis. But he particularly highlighted the UK's remarkable contribution to the huge progress made in tackling malaria - the oldest and deadliest disease - which in the past 15 years has seen child deaths cut in half and over three million young lives saved.
Brought together under the Every Woman Every Child partnership umbrella, these new creative solutions along with resources, collaboration and commitment will be able to make a difference to women and children, save lives and improve the prospects of future generations.
Have you ever wondered how your doctor chooses which medicine to prescribe? For some diseases they might have two, three or even 10 medicines to choose from, each of which has been approved as safe and effective by regulators.
Africa and its healthcare needs are changing. As its economic landscape shifts, burgeoning wealth co-exists with extreme poverty. While infectious diseases like malaria and HIV still place huge pressure on Africa, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as cancer and diabetes pose an increasing threat.
Drugs giant GlaxoSmithKline's commercial practices are under criminal investigation by the UK's major fraud unit, the company
Partnerships of any kind - be they romantic or professional - are never straightforward. There are differences of opinion that it can be difficult to reconcile and different ways of working can cause tension...
Malaria is obstinate. A massive effort by the international community along with the determination of committed individuals, scientists, health workers , governments, charities and other organisations have made a huge dent on its impact. Globally, cases are down 25%, deaths are down 42% since 2000 - but malaria is far from gone.
At the EU-Africa business summit I attended last week, a question that I heard again and again is what are the barriers to investing more in sub-Saharan Africa?
We have a problem in the UK, and that problem is having a detrimental impact on our performance, our growth, and our ability to compete on a global stage.
Think of disease in Africa and you maybe think of malaria. But this is not the whole picture. In Africa and across developing countries, people are living longer and their lifestyles are changing. With this shift, a different threat is emerging...
Malawi might not spring to mind as a hot-bed of healthcare innovation. Neither might Bangladesh or Colombia. But that view is changing. All over developing countries, determined people are finding brilliant and creative solutions for long-standing problems. ..
For many of us, the threat of contracting polio belongs in the past. We think of black and white photographs showing patients in wheelchairs or lying in an 'iron lung' to help them breathe. But for people in polio's last strongholds, the disease remains as real a threat today as it was 50 years ago.
The shortage of health workers is one of the most fundamental barriers to improving health in developing countries. A fully trained and well-supported community health worker like Saley can deliver treatments and provide health education to 5,000 children a year.
GlaxoSmithKline, owners of Lucozade and Ribena, is in "advanced talks" to sell the two drink brands to the Japanese group
The gap between the best and worst ICT teaching in England's schools will open to an "unacceptable level" if plans to ditch
Pharmaceuticals giant GlaxoSmithKline unveiled plans to build its first new manufacturing facility in the UK in almost 40