Gynaecological Cancer

It isn't about being confident in a bikini, it's about addressing the shame, embarrassment and lack of knowledge that women routinely experience when something goes wrong inside their pelvis (ovaries, womb, cervix, vagina) or between their legs (the vulva). This is body shaming of a different kind - internal, specific to women's reproductive health and genitals.
One day I will write a fun book about gynaecological cancers and looking after our vaginas. Until then, here is a short list
The majority of women have never spoken about gynaecological health issues and sexual anatomy with their parents, a leading
'There’s a taboo surrounding vaginas and I just want to get rid of it.'
Cara Delevingne has exposed her lady garden to raise awareness about gynaecological cancers, also known as “silent killers
Why are women not too embarrassed to show your genitals to a beauty therapist but are able to put up with the discomfort of waxing, but so embarrassed they can't go to the doctor and talk about the lump they've found in their vulva or the fact they're bleeding after sex?
The worst conversation many of us will ever have will relate to deadly diseases such as gynaecological cancers. And one thing is very clear to me - these diseases don't discriminate; they can affect women at any age. Nearly 20,000 women in the UK are diagnosed with a gynaecological cancer and almost 8,000 die within five years.