gynaecological

It isn't about being confident in a bikini, it's about addressing the shame, embarrassment and lack of knowledge that women routinely experience when something goes wrong inside their pelvis (ovaries, womb, cervix, vagina) or between their legs (the vulva). This is body shaming of a different kind - internal, specific to women's reproductive health and genitals.
There was a 30 year period in between the time my mum received her diagnosis and I received mine. While there is no doubt that treatment for endometriosis has improved, it doesn't seem that the process leading to diagnosis has, and this is so, so disheartening.
One day I will write a fun book about gynaecological cancers and looking after our vaginas. Until then, here is a short list
Let me explain. I was 50 when I was diagnosed with a high-grade uterine serous carcinoma - an uncommon form of womb cancer. At a molecular level it is much more like an ovarian cancer - except that it originated in my uterus. When it comes to treatment and access to clinical trials and new treatments that makes all the difference.
Why are women not too embarrassed to show your genitals to a beauty therapist but are able to put up with the discomfort of waxing, but so embarrassed they can't go to the doctor and talk about the lump they've found in their vulva or the fact they're bleeding after sex?
Being told that you have a gynaecological cancer can come as a total shock - especially as many women in the UK are not even aware that there are in fact five forms of gynaecological cancer - Womb, Ovarian, Cervical, Vulval and Vaginal.
I knew nothing about womb cancer before diagnosis. There had never been an awareness campaign for it in the UK, I didn't know anyone else who'd been through it and I had difficulty finding out anything about it. It felt as though I had a cancer that didn't exist.
The worst conversation many of us will ever have will relate to deadly diseases such as gynaecological cancers. And one thing is very clear to me - these diseases don't discriminate; they can affect women at any age. Nearly 20,000 women in the UK are diagnosed with a gynaecological cancer and almost 8,000 die within five years.